VETERINARY MEDICINE: PREFACE Back

A WORD ABOUT SAFETY
Before Explorers enter a working environment, review the hazards and risks faced in veterinary medicine; the precautions that are taken to prevent injury, illness, and disease transmission to caregivers and other animals; and the use of appropriate controls. Explorers should be provided appropriate training and personal protective equipment (PPE) before entering the working environment. Please consider whether they may need to be excluded from certain procedures, areas, or exams (e.g., X-rays or clinical laboratory procedures), and make appropriate safety accommodations. Due to the known hazards of ionizing radiation (X-rays), Explorers may not participate in the taking of radiographs. Trained laboratory technicians or their equivalent must be in immediate attendance whenever any clinical laboratory procedures are being carried out.

CATEGORY

  • Health
  • Veterinary Medicine

ADVISOR NOTE

  • This module explains the process of running a meeting. The number of times per month your post may meet will depend on local administration. You do not need to do all the activities in a given session during one meeting; rather, they may be spread over numerous meetings. Feel free to add your own activities. Have the Explorers suggest as many ideas for activities and tours as they can. Make sure everyone offers at least one idea.
  • Throughout the veterinary medicine program you will find that various tour options may require different planning and logistical considerations (e.g., transportation arrangements for travel to different venues, proper parent/guardian permission, etc.). When making arrangements in advance, keep in mind that different types of veterinary facilities may require more lead time than others for scheduling.
  • Advisors may find that the availability of some program choices or activities varies for posts in urban, suburban, and rural areas. For posts in urban areas, activities such as farm animal experiences and demonstrations may have to be shared via online videos or other audiovisual formats, if appropriate. Similarly, posts in rural areas may not have access to research laboratories, zoos, or other such facilities. Again there may be a need to use online videos or other audiovisual resources to learn about a topic.
  • Post Advisors will need to arrange for veterinarians or other knowledgeable individuals to speak to the group.
  • Identify additional adult leaders who are knowledgeable in the subject that you are currently studying and are available to participate in sessions. These leaders should be skilled in the activities of the subject, such as surgery or suturing, or in examinations and handling of the species you may be studying.
  • Familiarize yourself with and review standard safety precautions for both the facility and the animal species you are studying. Complete the current required Youth Protection training.
  • Be prepared for any possible medical occurrences such as fainting, cuts, bites, etc. Remember that exposure to veterinary medicine can lead to visual, olfactory, and physical responses.
  • Teens in the 14- to 18-year-old group are generally able to work with increased independence. Older teens can serve in a leadership role and help the younger members. Try to encourage this sort of peer mentoring. Try to play the role of Advisor, not leader, to your youth members.

A WORD ABOUT SAFETY

Before Explorers enter a working environment, review the hazards and risks faced in veterinary medicine; the precautions that are taken to prevent injury, illness, and disease transmission to caregivers and other animals; and the use of appropriate controls. Explorers should be provided appropriate training and personal protective equipment (PPE) before entering the working environment. Please consider whether they may need to be excluded from certain procedures, areas, or exams (e.g., X-rays or clinical laboratory procedures), and make appropriate safety accommodations. Due to the known hazards of ionizing radiation (X-rays), Explorers may not participate in the taking of radiographs. Trained laboratory technicians or their equivalent must be in immediate attendance whenever any clinical laboratory procedures are being carried out.

RESOURCES

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PREFACE: VETERINARY MEDICINE
Links to other websites are provided for your convenience and information only. When you click on a link to another website you will be leaving this [document/website/etc]. The fact that we provide links to other websites does not mean that we endorse, authorize or sponsor the linked website, or that we are affiliated with that website’s owners or sponsors. Unless otherwise indicated, the linked sites are not under our control and we are not responsible for and assume no liability for the content or presentation of any linked site or any link contained in a linked site, or any changes or updates to such sites. Your use of a linked site and its content is at your sole risk and may be subject to restrictions and/or limitations. Always take care to abide by the linked site’s terms of use, including any permission requirements/guidelines.